OCANPS Archive 2014 Calendar of Events

Spring/Summer 2014 Field Trips:

April 12th – Kessler Mountain, Fayetteville – Joe Neal    Meet at 9 a.m. at the entrance to Rock City atop Kessler Mountain. From I-540, turn west (toward Farmington) onto highway 62 (also MLK Blvd) and travel past Walmart, Lowe’s etc. for about 1.45 miles. Look for the road called SMOKE HOUSE TRAIL on the south side of the highway. Turn onto Smoke House Trail and travel about 0.6 or so miles, all on pavement, up the hill. Don’t turn onto Hoot Owl or anywhere else. There isn’t much parking space up there. Look for a sign or two about Kessler Greenways and Rock City. If you have trouble you can call me at 479-935-5170. I’ll get up there a little early to help everyone find the place. You can also google Kessler Greenways for more info.   Joe Neal 479-525-1858.

April 19th – 10:00 a.m. Lost Valley hike with NWACC plant biology students.   Kurtis Cecil and Burnetta will lead the hike at Lost Valley beginning at 10:00 a.m.  If you would like to join us, meet us at the parking lot. For more information, call Burnetta at 479-430-0260 or e-mail burhint@sbcglobal.net to let her know you are planning to come.

April 26th– 11:00AM – 3:00PM.  Bear Hollow Field Trip – The group will meet in the parking lot of the Ozarks Natural Science Center located at 1905 Madison 1305, Huntsville, AR 72740. (Please go to the ONSC site for a detailed map or to the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission site and type in “Bear Hollow”.) There are 8 miles of trails so we plan to split the group in two and study the plants of woodlands and glades. We will also stop at Withrow Springs State Park, time permitting. Bring a sack lunch, water, bug spray, cameras, binoculars and writing pads as we intend to create a plant list for the center. Contact Linda Ellis at lindasellis@centurytel.net  (417-272-3890).

 

April 27th – 10 a.m. 2014 POSTPONED TO MAY 11 DUE TO PREDICTED STORMS  Orchid Hike at Miller’s Chapel in South Washington County wilderness with Stephen Marquadt.  Last year our attempt at finding orchids in bloom was set back by the late snow event in early May.  We postponed the hike to late May, a glorious day; however, we saw no orchids blooming, though we did see lots of blooms plus a population of Ozark chinquapin.  Please meet at Stephen’s Ironworks shop at 360B North Centennial Ave, West Fork, AR 72774.  It is on old Hwy 71 at the McKnight Emergency Wrecker Service.  If anyone wants to meet at Winslow, meet at the only gas station there on Hwy. 71 and we should be there about 10:20. We will make another check on the two blight-resistant Ozark Chinquapin trees along the trail.  Hopefully, we will be able to locate some of the orchids that have been seen along the creek, including Twayblades, Showy Orchis and Adam & Eve orchids.

Last year we saw fresh Bobcat tracks on the bluff at the waterfall and had many other interesting finds.  This North-facing slope area is also very rich in bird and plant life.  The hike is moderate to easy.  Some of us might stay on the main trail (an old road) while others explore the woods and creeks on both sides.

May 2nd-4th ANPS Spring Meeting will be in Harrison, Arkansas (featuring the Buffalo National River and Baker Prairie) Jennifer Ogle, President Elect, is planning the hikes for Saturday and Sunday.  You can sign up for hikes on Friday night at the opening meeting, or meet in the Quality Inn parking lot Saturday May 3rd at 8 a.m.

LODGING AND MEETING Quality Inn, 1210 U.S. 62/65, Harrison AR 72601
(870) 741-7676   http://www.qualityinn.com/hotel-harrison-arkansas-AR056  ANPS has reserved 30 rooms at a reduced rate at Quality Inn in Harrison. Room and breakfast will be $76.49 plus tax. Rooms will be held until April 18th.

May 17th  9:30 a.m.– SWEPCO Eagle Watch Nature Trail and Round Prairie, Gentry, AR.   Terry Stanfill will lead us on a hike at the Eagle Watch nature viewing trail and later, we will visit the Round Prairie remnant right next to the city park.   Meet at the Eagle Watch parking area located 2.2 miles west of the Hwy. 59 and Hwy. 12 intersection in Gentry. https://www.swepco.com/environment/EagleWatch.aspx

May 24th – Ninestone – 9:30 a.m. Judith Griffith and Don Matt will host us at Ninestone this year, visiting the glades that were cleared of Eastern red cedar last year, honey locust and Sericea lespedeza last year. The removal of invasive species will benefit the native communities of glade plants which include Lanceleaf Coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata),

Fame Flower (Talinum calycinum), Scaly Blazing Star (Liatris squarrosa var. hirsuta), Poppy Mallow (Callihroe digitata), Widow’s Cross (Sedum pulchellum), Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), Little Bluestem (Schizacyrium scoparium), and other warm season grasses. As the glades are kept open and more native plants return from the seed bank, we expect the glade habitat to support plant species that will remain attractive to certain bird and reptile species. The glades provide nesting habitat for Blue-winged Warblers, Field Sparrows, Eastern Towhees and Prairie Warblers.

These procedures will benefit the native communities of glade plants which include Lanceleaf Coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata),Fame Flower (Talinum calycinum), Scaly Blazing Star (Liatris squarrosa var. hirsuta), Poppy Mallow (Callihroe digitata), Widow’s Cross (Sedum pulchellum), Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), Little Bluestem (Schizacyrium scoparium), and other warm season grasses. As the glades are kept open and more native plants return from the seed bank, we expect the glade habitat to support plant species that will remain attractive to certain bird and reptile species. The glades provide nesting habitat for Blue-winged Warblers, Field Sparrows, Eastern Towhees and Prairie Warblers.

Directions to Ninestone Land Trust in Carroll County:

1. For those coming from Berryville or North: From intersection of Hwy 62 E and Hwy 21 S just east of Berryville, take Hwy 21 South for 10 + miles to the site of the former Cedar Creek Country Store (now converted to a residence with a large parking lot out front) on the RIGHT.  You will see signs for CR 512.  IMMEDIATELY after the residence and parking lot turn RIGHT onto the gravel road marked CR 512.  DO NOT cross the bridge over Cedar Creek! Continue on gravel road CR 512 for 1 MILE, staying to the LEFT at any choices. You will pass 3 mailboxes on the LEFT, one a large blue mailbox, and a yellow ‘Watch for Dogs’ sign on the RIGHT. Continue on down the drive to our log cabin.

2. For those coming from Fayetteville or South: From intersection of Hwy 412 and Hwy 21 N, take Hwy 21 North for about 7 + miles. Cross the Cedar Creek Bridge and IMMEDIATELY turn LEFT onto the gravel road CR 512 before you get to the site of the former Cedar Creek Country Store (now converted to a residence) on the LEFT. Continue on gravel road CR 512 for 1 MILE, staying to the LEFT at any choices. You will pass 3 mailboxes on the LEFT, one a large blue mailbox, and a yellow ‘Watch for Dogs’ sign on the RIGHT. Continue on down the drive to our log cabin.

Please note: Ninestone Land Trust is private property. The public is welcome on organized field trips. Visits at other times are usually welcome, but must be arranged in advance. For more information, contact: Judith Ann Griffith & Don Matt, Ninestone Land Trust, 870-545-3559. Email: 9waterfall9@gmail.com.

May 25th – 1:30 p.m. – Water Restoration Project on the West Fork of the White River with Sandi Formica and Bob Morgan.  Meet at the Brentwood Community Center parking lot for the walk along this recent streamside restoration.   The center is located just off Hwy. 71, south of West Fork, AR.

May 31st – Devil’s Eyebrow Natural Area – 9 a.m.  Join Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission botanist Brent Baker for a tour and plant walk at Devil’s Eyebrow Natural Area, Arkansas’s newest natural area, in northeastern Benton County on the northern end of Beaver Lake.  This over 1700-acre natural area contains rugged terrain with deep, bluff-lined hollows along Indian Creek and its tributaries, separated by tall, steep ridges.  Much of the area is underlain by alternating layers of chert and limestone that include caves and many springs.  Plant communities are diverse and include high-quality glades, dry woodlands, bluffs, and rich hardwood and riparian forests.  Devil’s Eyebrow supports one of the highest concentrations of rare plant species in Arkansas, with several species more typical of cooler and moister forests to the north, while others share an affinity to the arid Southwest.  We’ll meet at the natural area parking lot at 9 AM and should be on the trail by 9:15.  Ending time somewhat open and dependent on participants, but we should definitely plan to return to vehicles by late afternoon.  Bring a sack lunch and plenty of water.  To get to Devil’s Eyebrow Natural Area, take US Hwy 62 northeast out of Rogers (through Avoca, Garfield, and just past Gateway) or northwest out of Eureka Springs (through Busch and almost to Gateway).  The parking area is at the end of a 0.25-mile gravel drive off of US Hwy 62, on the south side of the highway at the natural area/wildlife management area sign, about 0.5 mile east of the junction with AR Hwy 37 in the community of Gateway.  This walk will be on strenuous terrain, mostly off-trail, and may involve wading (or at least crossing several times) a creek with slick rocks, so dress appropriately.  Hiking poles are strongly recommended.  Due to the logistics of this field trip, participants will need to sign up in advance by contacting Brent by email (brent@arkansasheritage.org) or by phone (479.970.9143) by Tuesday, May 27th.  This trip will be limited to 20 participants.

June 21st  9:30 a.m.– Woolsey Prairie, Fayetteville.  Ginny Masullo and Steve Smith will lead us on the trails at Woolsey Prairie.   From the intersection of Wedington Drive (Ark. 16W) and I-540 in Fayetteville. Take Wedington Drive west approximately 1.2 miles to Rupple Road. Turn right (north) onto Rupple Road and drive to 1837 N Rupple Road, which is the driveway to Ginny and Steve’s house.  We can carpool from there to the site as there are very few parking spaces located at the Wastewater Facility.  After the hike, we will have lunch at Ginny and Steve’s and watch the DVD on Woolsey Prairie called “After the Burn” that was released last fall.  http://ecoarkansas.com/WoolseyMain.html